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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
,300 rockets into israel, many of them have been intercept bid the iron dome defense system, the israeli defense force is responding with air strikes on gaza, diplomatic efforts to secure a cease-fire have been unsuccessful so far. secretary of state hillary clinton met with prime minister netanyahu in a joint conflict the united states commitment to the israel is uncompromising. >> we came with a clear message, america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering, that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> rose: the secretary of state travels to cairo tomorrow to take part in further negotiations, joining me now is rashid khalidi, he is the edward site professor of modern arab studies in columbia university, in washington dennis ross is with the washington institute for near east policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east. >> and abrams on the council for foreign relations a deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy for president bush. his book tested by zion comes out later this year and i am pleased to h
factored in, and that makes me very nervous. we are being very defensive, given that risk is still out there. i wouldn't be shocked to see 5%, 10%, if we went off the cliff on the s&p. that wouldn't be a big surprise to me. put it into perspective, last august when we had the debt ceiling and a downgrade, we saw a much bigger fall in the stock market then. >> susie: you say you're uncomfortable with this kind of uncertainty. how are you positioning the portfolios for your investors? you said you're defensive. tell us more. >> so into the u.s. election, especially given that the polls were leaning towards obama, we had taken a defensive stance already. we had gone slightly underweight equities, and added more things like high-yield mortgage debt, emerging market debt, and mortgage-backed securities, that will yield as much as capital appreciation, and investments that have lower volatility than the stock market. so we have an overweight there. those investments i just spoke about, that's about 24% of our portfolio right now, and that's definitely helped us get through the last few weeks
the reaction from the streets of egypt. president morsi in his own defense says, "hey, actually, i'm defending the revolution because there's been so much obstruction that i need these powers just to run the country until there's a new constitution in place." plausible argument? >> it's a plausible argument, but i think for the transition it's a dangerous one. essentially, what you have is the transition process that's worked in a very bad fashion since the beginning hasn't produce aid consensus. it has 100 people who are supposed to be writing the constitution and it's dominated by islamist. the non-islammistes were threatening to walk out, not cooperating. so what morsi did yesterday was to say, okay, you can't challenge that process. and i think instead of making it so those people come back to the assembly and really buckle down and write a consensus document what, it's going to do is harden positions, so those people who are outside of the process, those people who are a minority in the constitutional assembly are just going to pull out of it entirely, and the whole process is going to be
that it has stronger defense capability then thought before. >> in terms of long-term security, how much has at the arab spring change the dynamics on that? >> that is an important issue, and there is a kind of hysteria about whether any of these islamic government can move toward real peace with israel, and are they likely to help their islamic brethren? so far, the president of egypt has taken a very bold position. he did not call for jihad. he did not break off relations with israel. that set the tenor for what is likely to transpire next. >> robin wright speaking to me a little earlier. >> the president of the democratic republic of congo said he is ready to look into the grievances of the march 23 rebel group. they have taken control of the eastern city of goma. they are true -- they are providing military support to the end 23 rebels. the rebels have taken a second city and say they will march on the capital. goma. the report from >> just days ago, these men were fighting in the bush. today, they are in a city of millions of habitants. -- inhabitants. they wait to hear what the future
, and it has an extremely important defensive damnive role, it is designed to remove the injured part of the body from the source of damage. and usually this is transient in nature, but with some diseases, such as cancer or arthritis, it becomes persistent and becomes not an damnive process but, adaptive process and part of the disease itself and adds to the pain .. as we will hear from laurie klein, chronic pain is a disease in its own right. as these arguments make clear, this is an enormous public health problem. 100 million americans as you pointed out suffer from pain every year, and it is the most common reason people seek medical attention. there are two kinds of chronic pain, inflammatory and neuropathic pain, inflammatory, receptive pain is damage to soft tissue and it shows the adaptive role of pain perfectly, it is designed to move the injured part of the body away from the damaging stimulus, so as to prevent further damage from occurring, and to allow the reparative processes to take place. but sometimes sort of a hypersensitivity develops with -- as a result of the inflam
, medicare benefits cut. they're willing to see cuts to defense. and that's also part of the sequester agreement. but they don't like cuts to other parts of the federal budget. >> how are the politics of this shaping up? we're looking at this from a strategic perspective, who harris the upper hand and who's playing from behind? >> the democrats feel they have the upper hand and you've seen to what extent it's posturing or not, you see a lot of sort of swagger coming out of obama in his press conference last week. and democratic leaders saying we're willing to go off the cliff. we are not going to compromise on the tax hikes. they're talking much less about the spending cuts that and also they say would be part of a so-called balanced deal. but i think on some level, republicans realize that they don't have a lot of leverage in this situation. certainly people want to see both taxes and spending. but the republicans that i talked to are a little bit nervous. and you see them also coming out with some tough talk. speaker boehner saying that he even wants to bring health care back into th
israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu, from defense minister ehud barak, that they achieved a lot of theirs goals, a cease-fire agreement with hamas in which they agree to not fire rockets. on a military level, they say they've managed to take out a lot of hamas' long-range rockets. that's something at the very beginning of this military operation, israeli officials promised the public here. >> now in the meantime today, there was the bombing in tel aviv. how much is known at this point about who did it and how they were able to do it? >> we've heard a lot of different groups take responsibility at this point. and we don't know yet who is responsible. rel officials say they're still looking for the person behind it. it had a couple of suspects that have been apprehended but no one has been named as the perpetrator of that attack. what we do know from the israeli police is they came from the west bank about two minutes past 12:00 here, which was just at the time when most people were taking their lunch break, they threw a bag on to a bus that was travelinged in the city of tel aviv
that the defense minister did a good job as well and a full 79% feel that the chief of staff -- they were pleased with his job in this campaign. the those seemed to be rather positive, of course, when people are looking at those numbers, looking ahead to next week's primaries. >> sreenivasan: so we saw a huge massive buildup of troops along the gaza border. what's happened to the israeli military now? are they withdrawing some? >> they are withdrawing some. at the same time the chief of staff has put out a statement that some will remain. we're in a cautious period right now. so while troops, yes, we were seeing them leave, we were seeing the tractors pull up and pull up the tanks and the tanks were withdrawing and so were the troops, we're getting ready to get out. some will be left behind. again, we're in this period right now of wait-and-see, measuring the situation. schools are not going back to operating tomorrow. those kids will still be staying home from school until the south. so the army is also at the same time keeping a presence down there. we don't get numbers. they won't give us numb
. and then came the 1980s and the tax cuts of ronald reagan combined with greater defense spending leading to hugely higher annual deficits covered by borrowing. and thus again a swelling nationa debt. but with no wars at all. then under presidents george h.w. bush and bill clinton we took action. for a while, both parties agreed, says simon johnson. >> there was a bipartisan agreement to raise revenue and put something of a damper on spending. so that's an important moment in the bigger picture, of course, that was just a small hesitation on the part of a much larger national debt. >> reporter: because in the bigger picture, a president just can't accomplish very much if he's cutting spending and won't raise taxes. and so yet again, more borrowing. under presidents george w. bush and barack obama. higher deficits and debt that, because of the graying baby boom, are fated to get even worse. >> the population was always going to age, the baby boomers were going to retire. they were paying a lot of social security contributions in 1990s. we were always going to shift into structural deficit
: jeffrey white, a defense fellow at the washington institute for near east policy, says the syrian government is waging a deliberate scorched- earth strategy. >> it's trying to get at f.s.a. units that are embedded inside the population. where the people are, the f.s.a. tends to be. but it is also to punish the people, the civilians, for supporting the f.s.a. the relationship between the f.s.a. units and the people is critical to the success of the rebellion. >> warner: why don't the regime forces just go in these areas and take them and hold them? >> it basically can't do that any longer. six months ago, they could go anywhere in the country, effectively, where they wanted with armor and mechanized forces simply push the f.s.a. out of the area and reestablish a presence. the opposition is strong enough now that for the regime's ground forces to go into those areas is a punishing affair for the regime. >> warner: throughout this conflict, syrian president bashar al-assad has blamed the high civilian deaths on the rebels themselves, foreign agents and military accidents. >> ( transl
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)